Balance between “body positivity” and “healthy living”?

This is a random post for me, but this question has stuck with me over the years and is important for me to ponder.

I always see posts on Instagram that tell girls to be “body positive”. While I think that that’s important, I don’t think that it’s a replacement for taking care of your body.

For example, “thick” and “curvy” girls are surely beautiful, but if they have diabetes, then should they really be “body positive”?

Likewise, if you’re too thin and aren’t eating right (i.e. anorexic), can you really be body positive either?

I think that loving yourself is important. But there comes a point where you’ve got to be honest with yourself and say, “Sure, people say I look good. But do I feel good?”

Feel free to leave your thoughts below.

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Day 1 of med school… complete!

All we did was go over policies… organizations… bla bla bla. It was all very good and informative, but I felt myself dozing off at some parts (despite the fact that I was sitting in the front row!).

1 more hour until the White Coat Ceremony 🙂 I hope that all of my family and friends make it…

Day 1 of med school… complete!

All we did was go over policies… organizations… bla bla bla. It was all very good and informative, but I felt myself dozing off at some parts (despite the fact that I was sitting in the front row!).

1 more hour until the White Coat Ceremony 🙂 I hope that all of my family and friends make it…

Reading ahead… :)

When I get stressed out about school, I tend to freeze up. I avoid studying; heck, I won’t even open up a book or my lecture notes.

But my college friends would always remind me to “do a little bit at a time,” and that I’ll “feel better once I gain some momentum.”

So here I am! I start my first year of medical school this Thursday, and I’m slightly stressed. My remedy is some self-guided studying on the scariest subject (in my opinion)… anatomy!

This figure diagrammatically depicts movements of the limbs, which take place at joints.

This morning, I practiced by completing a partial physical examination on my mom to check her carpometacarpal (CMC) and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. Both were fine! (Yay!)

Then we pretended that she experienced pain when I asked her to bring her thumb and little finger together (part C of the figure). According to this textbook entitled Clinically Oriented Anatomy, pain from this movement may be due to injury to either her CMC or her MCP joint.

As such, I wanted to determine if the pain was a result of her CMC joint, MCP joint, or both. So, I asked her to abduct and adduct her thumb as shown in part F of the figure. MCP is the active joint during this movement. If my mom had experienced pain during this movement, then I would have reason to believe that she has something wrong with her MCP joint–and perhaps her CMC joint as well! (Osteoarthritis anyone?)

Alright, *end lecture!* LAWL!

To all my medical school followers/geeks, please leave a comment if you believe that there is something wrong/incomplete with my analysis. I’m only on page 9 out of 70 for day 1’s reading for one class, so I’d appreciate your gentleness 😂

Books on books on books!

Yesterday, I went to the “Lending Library” on campus and picked up over a dozen books for FREE!

I will most-likely donate them back to the library once I’m done with them so that someone else can use them, too. 🙂

Here’s a pic of what I got!

Swag or what? 🤤